Loving Baseball: What Keeps the Game Great?

I’ve always read a lot about sports, and since the proliferation of sports media on the internet has made information even more available I’ve been reading multiple blog posts or features a day for quite some time now. That being said, this article from Joe Posnanski (http://sportsillustrated.cnn.com/vault/article/magazine/MAG1188482/) from a July, 2011 article of Sports Illustrated has stuck with me more than any other. In it, Posnanski doesn’t merely mention his opinions on the grand beauty of baseball. Rather, Posnanski takes reporting to the extreme and talks to the game’s greatest authorities. From the sheer experience exuded through the words of Vin Scully to the knowledge that comes from every nugget of information dropped by Bill James, this article is a veritable treasure trove of authority on the game I’ve grown to love since I was an infant. In addition to just being a story about what makes baseball great, Posnanski brings out the grander theory of why baseball is so great to the individual fan. Through his message he reminds everyone, from the lifetime Cubs fan who wants to die in peace to the young Yankees fan who knows nothing of adversity in the sport, exactly why we fell in love with this game in the first place. And as Posnanski ends the article by reminding, as it seems, me personally what, rather who, made me love the sport by connecting baseball back to the theme of fathers and sons playing catch, I was both moved and reinvigorated by the scope and wonder of baseball. Despite the fact that this article is growing to be as dated as the game itself seems to be to some fans, I had never before nor since read an article which evoked so much emotion about the game I love the most.

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2 thoughts on “Loving Baseball: What Keeps the Game Great?

  1. laurenamayosports

    Starting with the title, Posnanski causes the reader to question what makes them love baseball. By challenging the reader, Posnanski hooks them to continue to read on. The question makes readers think if I do love baseball, why do I or I don’t love baseball, why should I?
    Posnanski does not support his article by listing his opinions of the game but he talks to baseball authorities to get their input. This not only adds credibility to the article but it allows readers unfamiliar with the game to learn about some of baseball’s greatest commentators, fans, and players.

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  2. Miss__Melanie

    With this article, Posnanski inevitably causes the reader to question what it is about the game of baseball that first made them fall in love. As a new fan to the game myself (second season), I must say there’s a very alluring and American feel to the sport. Nothing says “summer is just around the corner” like hearing that pitchers have reported to spring training. Nothing says “summer is gone” like the start of the MLB playoffs. As the author points out, it’s a game that we all grow up learning how to play – regardless of gender. While football is definitely America’s favorite sport to watch, it will never be America’s favorite pastime. It will never be the game that one played countless times in the backyard and on the school yard. It’s a prestigious game. A superstitious one, too. Above all, it’s a timeless classic as pointed out by Posnanski. A game that is loved just as much by the legends as it is by the amateurs. The author really illustrates that by talking to those who have followed the game closely for the majority of their lives and also by throwing in every day anecdotes like the story of “Wonderboy” to the personal conversation between himself and his father.

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