Jones motivated by brother’s murder by By Mark Schlabach

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The story behind the death of Jarvis Jones’ brother, someone the all-American outside linebacker and pass rusher extraordinaire and 17th overall draft pick in the 2013 NFL draft clearly admired growing up is one that causes Jones great anguish, but also fueled him to become a quarterback sacking machine in his two years at Georgia. One could see by watching Jones’ games that he is a driven individual, giving maximum effort on every play and taking over games at will. This is the greatest sports story I have ever read because of the hardships Jones faced and endured. He could have gone down the wrong path, and did for a little while, but eventually he made it to the top, and after all of the hardships he faced, Jones is a millionaire playing for one of the premiere franchises in the history of the NFL, the Pittsburgh Steelers.

http://espn.go.com/college-football/story/_/page/football-120926Schlabach/college-football-georgia-bulldogs-lb-jarvis-jones-overcomes-family-tragedy-star-field

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6 thoughts on “Jones motivated by brother’s murder by By Mark Schlabach

  1. tanyasic

    I first read about this story in a Sports Illustrated piece titled “The Fight in the Dog.” It’s heartbreaking. And like Connor said, these stories seem to be so frequent in sports. But the type of drive and motivation that comes from hardships like the death of a loved one is unparalleled. I think this article, as well as the one from SI, does a great job making someone so tough and talented relatable. It’s easy to be a fan of an athlete like Jarvis Jones, but articles like this one help you empathize with the person underneath the shoulder pads and helmet and appreciate his will to succeed even more.

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  2. theshandacrowe

    Having previously heard Mark Schlabach speak at the Grady Symposium, I was excited to read one of his pieces especially something on Jarvis Jones, one of my favorite players of all time. This was a nice piece about the story behind the athlete. I love those types of stories that highlight someone’s motivations for playing the game. Schlabach does a great job of talking to both Jones and those around him who have known him for a long time. I’m proud to one day join Schlabach as a Grady alum. He represents us well.

    Reply
  3. jamiehannn

    Often times, people find it shocking that big named football players actually have lives and emotions outside of the pads and off the field. Jarvis Jones walked around the campus and everyone praised the ground he walked on. Anyone nicknamed “Sacman Jones” is someone that’s bound to live up greatly to his name. This story does a great job of digging past just who America sees him as, a first round pick, and bring life and emotion to him. I love how Mark Schlabach draws so much raw emotion from Jones and it almost reaches through the computer screen and touches your heart. To know that Jones charges every quarterback, makes every tackle, and recovers every fumble with a purpose so much greater than to make the play is something that makes Jarvis Jones so much more respectable than just your average football player.

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  4. connorsmo

    Great choice Raleigh. Schlabach was able to draw much emotion out of both Jones and his audience in this piece. It’s a shame to say, but sports fans see more and more of these stories these days of how athletes are motivated from a tragic event, and while they are all heart-warming stories, it’s as if you’re reading the same one and over and again. With that being said, journalists need to do something to separate their stories from the rest. I think Schlabach was able to do that with his organization, and the way he brought up how Jones didn’t even want to play football. Yes, it’s awesome that Jones was able to find motivation from his brother’s death, and sports fans have seen that before, but the fact that a two-time All-American didn’t even want to play football is something that will stick in the mind’s of readers.

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  5. vannabro

    I loved everything about this article. I loved how Mark Schlabach was able to get such deep details and emotion from Jarvis. I always looked up to him throughout his time playing at UGA and I was proud to say that he represented our school. This article makes me respect Jones more than ever before. It dug deep into who he is and what has made him such a strong man and player. Schlabach was able to pull emotions from not just Jones, but from the readers as well. Even though I have not lost a sibling, I have experienced lost and after reading this I felt that I could relate with Jarvis Jones more than I thought.

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  6. collinsbradshaw

    This article was very touching. Jarvis is a friend of mine and he never once mentioned his past struggles. This article really is a well written piece and depicts Jones very well. Most athletes when interviewed about their past talk about the struggles they faced that ultimately catapulted them to where they currently are but this story is a unique and intriguing story. Jarvis has never been open about what happened when interviewed unless he is specifically asked. This article is very eye opening to many readers and is a very personable raw story. Thanks for sharing.

    Reply

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